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MEIJI SHRINE 明治神宮 #CandidCuisineTokyo

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

#CandidCuisineTokyo

I’m delighted to let you know that I will now start blogging about my recent travel to one of my favourite cities with the brightest night lights, Tokyo. It’s known that I’m a city person, and any place with a very accessible train station is bound to really keep me interested and full of wanderlust. Over the next weeks, I’ll share my travel adventures, tips on how to get the most out of your Tokyo trip (including not getting lost), and most of all, gastronomic experiences including Michelin Star restaurants that made my Tokyo trip worthwhile.

First Stop: MEIJI SHRINE 明治神宮

No trip to Tokyo will be complete without stopping by one of Japan’s most well-known landmarks, Meiji Shrine. Dedicated to the defied spirits of Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken, you won’t fully appreciate the Shibuya crossing and night lights without first walking through Japan’s rich history and culture.

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

Built in Nagare-zukuri style over 90 years ago, the Shinto shrine has a gabled roof, pointing outwards that is one of the significant qualities of the shrine. If you’re lucky enough you’ll encounter a wedding being held in the Shrine, which is commonly held on Sundays.

Before you enter Meiji Jingu, it’s best to stop by for a nice Iced Cafe Latte and Chocolate Croissants at Cafe Mori, as the trek in the 700,000 acres of land will surely tire you along the way.

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

At the entrance to the Meiji Jingu, the 40-foot high torii gate is made from 1,500 year old cypress tree, as well as the second one after the wine barrels.

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

Barrels of Sake donated to the shrine should be the first you will see.

Tokyo

Tokyo

Tokyo

Tokyo

Before you enter, you should cleanse by washing your hands, or perform Temizu, as this is a Shinto custom. Any person may do this even those who don’t practice Shintoism.

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

Moving forward you can see the wishes of the people who visit the Meiji Shrine. It’s also a must to donate an offering to the Shrine, as a sign of respect.

Meiji Shrine Tokyo

How to Get to Meiji Shrine

Nearest Train Station: Harajuku (JR Yamanote line) ; Meiji-Jingumae (Fukutoshin lines, Chiyoda lines)
Entrance Fee: Free
Opening Hours: 24/7, 365 Days

Stay Connected with Meiji Shrine:

Official Website: www.meijijingu.or.jp

Vhalerie Lee
Follow me on Instagram @candidcuisine for more gastronomic adventures and travel tales